top of page

Student Group

Public·328 members
Kai Allen
Kai Allen

CGAxis 8K PBR Textures Collection Volume 22 – Roofs: The Ultimate Collection of Roof Coverings for Your 3D Projects


CGAxis 8K PBR Textures Collection Volume 22 Roofs: A Review




If you are looking for high-quality and realistic roof textures for your 3D projects, you might want to check out CGAxis 8K PBR Textures Collection Volume 22 Roofs. This is a collection of 100 PBR textures of roof coverings in various shapes, colors, and degrees of wear. Whether you need clean and new, rusted, damaged, or moss-covered roofs, this collection has it all.




CGAxis 8K PBR Textures Collection Volume 22 – Roofs



PBR stands for Physically Based Rendering, which is a method of shading and rendering that provides a more accurate representation of how light interacts with surfaces. By using PBR textures, you can achieve more realistic and consistent results across different lighting conditions and software. PBR textures also allow you to adjust various parameters such as color, roughness, height, normal, reflection, and ambient occlusion to suit your needs.


CGAxis 8K PBR Textures Collection Volume 22 Roofs comes with both 8K and 4K versions of each texture, so you can choose the resolution that best suits your project. Each texture also includes seven maps: diffuse/albedo, glossiness, roughness, height/displacement, normal, reflection, and ambient occlusion. These maps can be used in both specular and metalness workflows, depending on your software and preference. Additionally, many textures come with Substance (SBSAR) files that allow you to tweak them even further using Substance Player or Substance Designer.


How to use CGAxis 8K PBR Textures Collection Volume 22 Roofs in different software and workflows?




Specular and metalness workflows




PBR textures can be used in two different workflows: specular and metalness. The specular workflow uses the diffuse, glossiness, normal, reflection, height/displacement, and ambient occlusion maps. The metalness workflow uses the albedo (or base color), roughness (or smoothness), normal, metallic (or metalness), height/displacement, and ambient occlusion maps. The difference between these workflows is how they define the reflectivity of a surface.


In the specular workflow, the reflectivity is determined by the reflection map (or specular map), which defines how shiny or dull a surface is. In the metalness workflow, the reflectivity is determined by the metallic map (or metalness map), which defines how metallic or non-metallic a surface is. The advantage of the metalness workflow is that it requires fewer maps and simplifies the shading process.


Depending on your software and preference, you can use either workflow with CGAxis 8K PBR Textures Collection Volume 22 Roofs. However, some software may require you to convert or rename some maps to match their naming conventions. For example, if your software uses albedo instead of diffuse, or roughness instead of glossiness, you may need to rename or convert the maps accordingly. For example, you can use an online tool such as NormalMap-Online to convert a glossiness map to a roughness map, or vice versa.


Compatible software and formats




CGAxis 8K PBR Textures Collection Volume 22 Roofs is compatible with most 3D software and render engines that support PBR textures and materials. Some examples are:


  • 3ds Max



  • Maya



  • Blender



  • Cinema 4D



  • SketchUp



  • Unreal Engine



  • Unity



  • Substance Painter



  • Substance Designer



  • Substance Player



  • V-Ray



  • Corona Renderer



  • Arnold Renderer



  • Octane Render



  • Lumion



  • Twinmotion



  • Enscape



The collection includes textures in JPG, PNG, and SBSAR formats. JPG and PNG are common image formats that can be used in any software. SBSAR is a proprietary format of Substance that can be used in Substance Player, Substance Designer, or any software that supports Substance plugins.


Tips and tricks for realistic results




To achieve realistic results with CGAxis 8K PBR Textures Collection Volume 22 Roofs, here are some tips and tricks you can follow:


  • Use the appropriate resolution for your project. If you are working on a close-up shot, you may want to use the 8K version of the texture to capture more details. If you are working on a distant shot, you may want to use the 4K version of the texture to save memory and rendering time.



  • Use the correct workflow for your software and preference. If you are using a specular workflow, make sure to use the diffuse, glossiness, normal, reflection, height/displacement, and ambient occlusion maps. If you are using a metalness workflow, make sure to use the albedo, roughness, normal, metallic, height/displacement, and ambient occlusion maps.



  • Use the correct UV mapping and scaling for your roof model. Make sure that the texture covers the entire roof surface without stretching or repeating. You can adjust the UV mapping and scaling in your 3D software or in Substance Designer.



  • Add some variation and randomness to your roof texture. You can use the Substance files to create different variations of the same texture by changing the parameters such as color, roughness, height, normal, reflection, and ambient occlusion. You can also use different textures for different parts of the roof to create more diversity and realism.



  • Add some environmental effects to your roof texture. You can use some post-processing effects such as dirt, dust, water, snow, or moss to make your roof texture more realistic and dynamic. You can also use some lighting effects such as shadows, reflections, or global illumination to enhance the mood and atmosphere of your scene.



What are the different types of roof textures included in this collection?




CGAxis 8K PBR Textures Collection Volume 22 Roofs includes five different types of roof textures: ceramic roofs, wooden roofs, stone roofs, metal roofs, and roofing felt roofs. Each type has its own characteristics and advantages for different styles and scenarios. Here is a brief overview of each type:


Ceramic roofs




Ceramic roofs are made of clay tiles that are shaped and baked at high temperatures. They are one of the oldest and most common types of roof coverings in the world. They have a distinctive appearance and color that can vary from red to brown to gray. They are durable, fire-resistant, and eco-friendly. However, they are also heavy, brittle, and expensive.


In this collection, you will find 20 ceramic roof textures that range from new and clean to old and damaged. Some examples are:



  • Ceramic Roof 01: A red ceramic roof with a smooth surface and a slight glossiness.



  • Ceramic Roof 02: A brown ceramic roof with a rough surface and some cracks and chips.



  • Ceramic Roof 03: A gray ceramic roof with a matte surface and some moss and dirt.



  • Ceramic Roof 04: A multicolored ceramic roof with a mix of red, brown, gray, and green tiles.



  • Ceramic Roof 05: A black ceramic roof with a shiny surface and some scratches and stains.




  • Ceramic Roof 07: A green ceramic roof with a rough surface and some algae and mold.



  • Ceramic Roof 08: A beige ceramic roof with a smooth surface and some cracks and holes.



  • Ceramic Roof 09: A red ceramic roof with a rough surface and some broken and missing tiles.



  • Ceramic Roof 10: A gray ceramic roof with a smooth surface and some rust and corrosion.




Wooden roofs




Wooden roofs are made of wood shingles or shakes that are cut from logs or split from blocks. They are one of the most natural and aesthetic types of roof coverings. They have a warm and rustic look that can blend well with the environment. They are lightweight, flexible, and renewable. However, they are also flammable, prone to rotting, and require regular maintenance.


In this collection, you will find 20 wooden roof textures that range from new and clean to old and weathered. Some examples are:



  • Wooden Roof 01: A light brown wooden roof with a smooth surface and a slight glossiness.



  • Wooden Roof 02: A dark brown wooden roof with a rough surface and some cracks and splits.



  • Wooden Roof 03: A gray wooden roof with a matte surface and some moss and dirt.



  • Wooden Roof 04: A multicolored wooden roof with a mix of brown, gray, green, and red shingles.



  • Wooden Roof 05: A black wooden roof with a shiny surface and some scratches and stains.



- Wooden Roof 06: A white wooden roof with a smooth surface and some yellow and blue patterns.


  • Wooden Roof 07: A green wooden roof with a rough surface and some algae and mold.



  • Wooden Roof 08: A beige wooden roof with a smooth surface and some cracks and holes.



  • Wooden Roof 09: A red wooden roof with a rough surface and some broken and missing shingles.



  • Wooden Roof 10: A gray wooden roof with a smooth surface and some rust and corrosion.




Stone roofs




Stone roofs are made of stone slabs or tiles that are cut from natural rocks or quarried from mines. They are one of the most durable and resistant types of roof coverings. They have a solid and elegant look that can suit various architectural styles. They are fireproof, waterproof, and weatherproof. However, they are also heavy, expensive, and hard to install.


In this collection, you will find 20 stone roof textures that range from new and clean to old and damaged. Some examples are:



  • Stone Roof 01: A light gray stone roof with a smooth surface and a slight glossiness.



  • Stone Roof 02: A dark gray stone roof with a rough surface and some cracks and chips.



  • Stone Roof 03: A brown stone roof with a matte surface and some moss and dirt.



  • Stone Roof 04: A multicolored stone roof with a mix of gray, brown, green, and red tiles.



  • Stone Roof 05: A black stone roof with a shiny surface and some scratches and stains.



- Stone Roof 06: A white stone roof with a smooth surface and some yellow and blue patterns.


  • Stone Roof 07: A green stone roof with a rough surface and some algae and mold.



  • Stone Roof 08: A beige stone roof with a smooth surface and some cracks and holes.



  • Stone Roof 09: A red stone roof with a rough surface and some broken and missing tiles.



  • Stone Roof 10: A gray stone roof with a smooth surface and some rust and corrosion.




Metal roofs




Metal roofs are made of metal sheets or panels that are coated with various materials such as zinc, copper, aluminum, or steel. They are one of the most modern and versatile types of roof coverings. They have a sleek and shiny look that can reflect light and heat. They are lightweight, durable, recyclable, and energy-efficient. However, they are also noisy, prone to denting, and susceptible to corrosion.


In this collection, you will find 20 metal roof textures that range from new and clean to old and damaged. Some examples are:



  • Metal Roof 01: A silver metal roof with a smooth surface and a slight glossiness.



  • Metal Roof 02: A dark gray metal roof with a rough surface and some cracks and chips.



  • Metal Roof 03: A brown metal roof with a matte surface and some moss and dirt.



  • Metal Roof 04: A multicolored metal roof with a mix of silver, gold, copper, and bronze panels.



  • Metal Roof 05: A black metal roof with a shiny surface and some scratches and stains.



- Metal Roof 06: A white metal roof with a smooth surface and some yellow and blue patterns.


  • Metal Roof 07: A green metal roof with a rough surface and some algae and mold.



  • Metal Roof 08: A beige metal roof with a smooth surface and some cracks and holes.



  • Metal Roof 09: A red metal roof with a rough surface and some broken and missing panels.



  • Metal Roof 10: A gray metal roof with a smooth surface and some rust and corrosion.




Roofing felt roofs




Roofing felt roofs are made of roofing felt, which is a type of fabric that is impregnated with bitumen or asphalt. They are one of the most economical and easy to install types of roof coverings. They have a flat and smooth look that can be painted or coated with various colors and materials. They are waterproof, fire-resistant, and soundproof. However, they are also fragile, prone to tearing, and require regular replacement.


In this collection, you will find 20 roofing felt roof textures that range from new and clean to old and damaged. Some examples are:



  • Roofing Felt Roof 01: A light gray roofing felt roof with a smooth surface and a slight glossiness.



  • Roofing Felt Roof 02: A dark gray roofing felt roof with a rough surface and some cracks and chips.



  • Roofing Felt Roof 03: A brown roofing felt roof with a matte surface and some moss and dirt.



  • Roofing Felt Roof 04: A multicolored roofing felt roof with a mix of gray, brown, green, and red patches.



  • Roofing Felt Roof 05: A black roofing felt roof with a shiny surface and some scratches and stains.



- Roofing Felt Roof 06: A white roofing felt roof with a smooth surface and some yellow and blue patterns.


  • Roofing Felt Roof 07: A green roofing felt roof with a rough surface and some algae and mold.



  • Roofing Felt Roof 08: A beige roofing felt roof with a smooth surface and some cracks and holes.



  • Roofing Felt Roof 09: A red roofing felt roof with a rough surface and some broken and missing patches.



  • Roofing Felt Roof 10: A gray roofing felt roof with a smooth surface and some rust and corrosion.




How to customize and tweak the roof textures using Substance files?




One of the best features of CGAxis 8K PBR Textures Collection Volume 22 Roofs is that many textures come with Substance (SBSAR) files that allow you to customize and tweak them using Substance Player or Substance Designer. Substance is a powerful tool that lets you create, edit, and manipulate PBR textures using a node-based system. You can adjust various parameters such as color, roughness, height, normal, reflection, and ambient occlusion to create endless variations and combinations of roof textures.


What are Substance files and how do they work?




Substance files are files that contain the information and logic of a PBR texture. They are not images, but rather instructions on how to generate images. They are dynamic, procedural, and parametric, meaning that they can change according to user input, randomization, or external factors. They are also lightweight, scalable, and portable, meaning that they can be used in any resolution, software, or platform.


To use Substance files, you need to have Substance Player or Substance Designer installed on your computer. Substance Player is a free application that lets you view, edit, and export Substance files. Substance Designer is a paid application that lets you create, edit, and export Substance files. You can download both applications from https://www.substance3d.com/products/substance-player/ and https://www.substance3d.com/products/substance-designer/.


How to adjust parameters such as color, roughness, height, normal, reflection, and ambient occlusion?




To adjust the parameters of a Substance file, you need to open it in Substance Player or Substance Designer. You will see a preview of the texture on the left side of the screen, and a list of parameters on the right side of the screen. You can change the values of the parameters by dragging the sliders, typing numbers, or using color pickers. You will see the changes in real time on the preview.


Some of the common parameters that you can adjust are:



  • Color: This parameter lets you change the hue, saturation, brightness, contrast, or tint of the texture. You can use it to create different color variations of the same texture.



  • Roughness: This parameter lets you change how rough or smooth the surface of the texture is. You can use it to create different levels of glossiness or matte-ness of the texture.



  • Height: This parameter lets you change how high or low the surface of the texture is. You can use it to create different levels of depth or relief of the texture.



  • Normal: This parameter lets you change how the surface of the texture reacts to light. You can use it to create different levels of detail or bumpiness of the texture.



  • Reflection: This parameter lets you change how reflective or dull the surface of the texture is. You can use it to create different levels of shininess or dullness of the texture.



  • Ambient Occlusion: This parameter lets you change how dark or light the shadows of the texture are. You can use it to create different levels of contrast or realism of the texture.



How to create variations and combinations of roof textures using Substance files?




Another advantage of Substance files is that they allow you to create variations and combinations of roof textures using different methods. You can use these methods to create more diversity and realism for your roof design and rendering. Some of the methods are:



  • Random seed: This method lets you generate random variations of the same texture by changing the seed value of the Substance file. You can use it to create different patterns, colors, or details of the texture.



  • Blending: This method lets you blend two or more textures together using different modes and opacity values. You can use it to create different mixtures, transitions, or effects of the textures.



  • Masking: This method lets you mask out parts of a texture using another texture or a grayscale image. You can use it to create different shapes, holes, or patches of the texture.



  • Layering: This method lets you layer two or more textures on top of each other using different modes and opacity values. You can use it to create different overlays, decals, or stickers of the textures.



Conclusion




CGAxis 8K PBR Textures Collection Volume 22 Roofs is a collection of 100 PBR textures of roof coverings in various shapes, colors, and degrees of wear. It is a great resource for anyone who needs high-quality and realistic roof textures for their 3D projects. It offers many benefits such as:



  • High resolution: The collection comes with both 8K and 4K versions of each texture, so you can choose the resolution that best suits your project.



  • PBR compatibility: The collection includes seven maps for each texture that can be used in both specular and metalness workflows, depending on your software and preference.



  • Substance support: Many textures come with Substance files that allow you to customize and tweak them using Substance Player or Substance Designer.



  • Variety: The collection includes five different types of roof textures: ceramic roofs, wooden roofs, stone roofs, metal roofs, and roofing felt roofs. Each type has its own characteristics and advantages for different styles and scenarios.



If you are interested in CGAxis 8K PBR Textures Collection Volume 22 Roofs, you can visit the product page here and get it for a discounted price. You can also check out other collections from CGAxis that offer more PBR textures for different surfaces and materials.


Thank you for reading this article. I hope you found it helpful and informative. If you have any questions or feedback, please feel free to leave a comment below. I would love to hear from you.


Fr


About

Welcome to the group! You can connect with other members, ge...

Members

bottom of page